Battery Powered Trimmers Come Of Age

If you’re in the market for a powerful new ally in the war on weeds and other unruly vegetation, cordless electric trimmers deserve a hard look. The latest generation of engines and batteries features lower price tags plus increases in power, performance and runtimes, giving lawn-conscious weed whippers from homeowners to hard-core groundskeepers plenty of reasons to make the switch from gas to electric. Today’s electric trimmers deliver the power without the hassles, heft or noise of their gas-burning counterparts. Imagine the convenience—there’s zero engine maintenance, no mixing fuel, and they start instantly, even after spending a long winter in cold storage. New technologies have ushered in a new age of lightweight yet extremely powerful batteries that make electric-powered trimmers true lightweight champions. Plus, the whisper-quiet operation is easy on the ears and well-suited to low-noise environments. Stihl’s three-tiered lineup of Lightning Battery System trimmers is a perfect example, offering options tailored to occasional, frequent and extensive use. The selection ranges from models perfect for smaller yards to those geared to bigger projects and professional-grade workhorses ideal for large properties. In Stihl’s occasional use AI Series, for example, the Stihl FSA 45 Trimmer weighs just 5.1 pounds (including battery), yet it has a 9-inch cutting swath and easily manicures up to 1,312 feet per charge. In the frequent-use AK Series, the FSA 56 Trimmer blazes a 10.5-inch swath for 1,640 feet per charge, yet weights just 7.3 pounds. And the FSA 65, part of the extensive-use AP Series, tips the scale at 9.5 pounds but can trim a 12-inch-wide swath a whopping 2,559 feet per charge. As a bonus, Stihl’s Lightning Series strikes more than once. It also includes powerful options in battery-fired chainsaws, hedge trimmers, blowers, pole pruners, mowers and cut-off machines, meaning if you have outdoor work to do, there’s a Stihl battery-powered product that’s up to the job. Written by: Dan Johnson